Customs, traditions, festivals

Augsburg, Maximilianmuseum, Aussenansicht Enlarge image (© picture-alliance / akg-images / ) There are a lot of long standing traditions in Germany. Karneval, Oktoberfest, Easter and Christmas, just to mention a few.

Rosenmontagsumzug in Köln: Gruppe mit Clown-Marionetten

Carnival – from Rosenmontag (Rose Monday) to Ash Wednesday

When kilometre-long processions wind their way through Cologne, Mainz and Düsseldorf, huge gaily costumed crowds dance and sing their hearts out and people sporting strange headgear shout “Alaaf” and “Helau” in a hail of sweets and confetti, Germany’s Carnival season has reached its peak. It’s Rosenmontag (Rose Monday)!

This year's Wiesn-Bierkrug design

Oktoberfest

The “Münchner Oktoberfest”, or as the local Bavarians refer to it, “Die Wiesn” is the single biggest and most prestigious fair in the world. However, it is also one the most traditional fairs in the world and gives the visitor a good insight on the mixture between 21st century modern Germany and ancient Bavarian culture and customs.

Easter eggs

Easter Traditions in Germany: Painted Eggs and Tail-Coated Horsemen

Christ’s resurrection has given us one of the most important festivals in the calendar. Easter is deeply rooted in German culture: it is a time for celebrations across the country – and the observance of a wide range of customs.

Tausende Laternen brennen bei Martinsfeier in Erfurt

The Celebration of St. Martin

"Lantern, lantern, sun, moon, and stars. . . " This refrain echoes through the autumn streets of Germany every year on November 11. Happy children with colorful, handmade lanterns promenade through the streets, cheerfully singing songs they learned by heart. The candles in the lanterns flicker playfully, bringing a sparkle to the children’s eyes. Brimming with excitement, each child hopes to catch a glimpse of the man dressed in a medieval soldier’s uniform and his proud steed as they lead the procession of children.

Annaberger Weihnachtsmarkt im festlichen Glanz

Christmas in Germany

For many people christmas is a time of reflection, for others the most stressful time of the year. What ever they might think of it, for most Germans the time leading up to christmas and christmas itself is a time of many old traditions, of which many have been adopted by other countries throughout the world.

Customs, traditions, festivals